Real Musicians and Rhythmic Complexity

Real Musicians and Rhythmic Complexity One of the most common reasons for slowdowns in recording sessions with real musicians are (unnecessarily) tricky rhythms. As a composer/orchestrator you should always be sure that real musicians are not sequencers that can play...

“Simile” Mark in Film Scoring

“Simile” Mark in Film Scoring When you’re writing a score sheet, especially when for a film score, rather prefer to use the word “simile” or “sim.” (meaning “in the same way”) where you can instead of articulating/marking everything. This has a massively...

Musical Studies in the Internet Age

Musical Studies in the Internet Age There has probably never been a more accessible base of knowledge available for learning composers before than in today’s times. Being able to watch legendary performances of all sorts of music on Youtube, listen to millions of...

Written Out Warm Ups for Brass

Written out warm ups for Brass On longer cues that incorporate the brass only briefly and only on some sections of the cue, it is easier for the players if you help them with a “written out warm up” rather than throwing them into cold water by requesting a big and...

Marking Scores During Recording Sessions

Marking Scores During Recording Sessions In recording session situations, it is crucial to keep an overview over which parts of a cue are already covered in a good take and which parts still need another take or a few bars to patch them later in the editing. A very...