Low Interval Limits

Low Interval Limits The reason why some chord voicings sound muddy and unfocussed often lies in the fact that they violate the so-called low interval limits. These limits are guidelines for every interval structure and the lowest possible position they can be played...

Drop 2 and Drop 2+4

Drop 2 and Drop 2+4 A very easy way to gain more sonority in your chord voicings or to make more space for the top line is to “drop 2”, “drop 2+4” or traditionally called “open voicing”. These are pretty simple procedures to spread out close position voicings to fill...

Symmetrical Scales

Symmetrical Scales Symmetrical Scales are called like this because they are built out of structures that repeat, for instance the two most common ones are the whole tone scale (consisting only – as the name implies – out of whole tone steps) and the...

Minor Ninths

Minor Ninths The minor ninth is considered the “last dissonant interval”, even more than a minor second. Therefore it should be handled with care in any chord voicing (including minor ninths + octave(s)). The inherent dissonance in this interval will often...

Parallel Movement of Several Voices

Parallel Movement of Several Voices Parallel movement of many voices usually sounds musically rather unattractive. Particularly if you let several voices leap into the same direction, the collective change of instrumental register will create a sonical disconnect that...