Low Interval Limits

Low Interval Limits The reason why some chord voicings sound muddy and unfocussed often lies in the fact that they violate the so-called low interval limits. These limits are guidelines for every interval structure and the lowest possible position they can be played...

Drop 2 and Drop 2+4

Drop 2 and Drop 2+4 A very easy way to gain more sonority in your chord voicings or to make more space for the top line is to “drop 2”, “drop 2+4” or traditionally called “open voicing”. These are pretty simple procedures to spread out close position voicings to fill...

Minor Ninths

Minor Ninths The minor ninth is considered the “last dissonant interval”, even more than a minor second. Therefore it should be handled with care in any chord voicing (including minor ninths + octave(s)). The inherent dissonance in this interval will often...

Linear Bass Motion

Linear Bass Motion Linear bass motion (or rather bass lines with strong melodic quality/voice leading) in general feel very attractive to the ear. Their power is actually strong enough to make even the strangest chord progressions on top of that plausible to our ear....